My Breakfast Yoga: Warm Up Sequence

It’s been a few weeks since I last wrote a blog.  Mainly because I have been updating my website with a New Look and haven’t been able to follow up on the blogs I had promised.  However Hush Yoga’s new look is nearly finished and the site is ready for me to post weekly yoga blogs.  I still have some work to do, like changing the menu photo – it’s a bit large, to say the least!!! So I am toying around with other ideas at the moment.  If you’d like to offer any suggestions, I’d love to hear them.

So here’s the continuation to the warm up blog as posted below.hush yoga, Sinead in lunge pose

We’ve already sat for a few moments in meditation, focused on breath to centre body and mind and gone through postures such as Child’s pose, downward dog, baby cobra and cobra (as previous post).

Continuing along from the last posture, child’s pose I move back into downward facing dog holding for a 5-7 deep ujjiya breaths.

From downward dog, step your right foot forward to your hands to lunge pose.

In lunge pose stay on the finger tips, lifting chest up and forward while drawing the shoulder blades towards the spine.

The right knee should be directly over the ankle in correct alignment.

The back leg is straight with the thigh bone lifting up towards the ceiling which keeps the leg active and strong.

The left heal is stretching back while the right knee is moving forward, creating length and flexibility  in legs, while the feet are energetically moving towards each other to create strength and stability.  This also helps to align the hips. The right hip pulls back, left hip forward.

The left thigh is rotating inwards, slightly while tailbone moving forward and core muscles should be engaged.

Hold Lunge pose for about 5-7 breaths, step back to downward dog. Hold for 5-7 breaths.  Then step the left foot forward to lunge following the same instructions as above

Move back to downward dog and repeat the sequence in previous blog.

hush yoga, Sinead O'Connor YogaFrom Downward Dog,  step right foot forward to lunge, then left foot forward so you end up in a forward bend.  In the photo I have my legs straight but I often keep knees bent in the warm up sequence until I feel the hamstrings have warmed up.

Viola!  Including the postures in the post below it is a 10 minute warm up giving time to your body and mind to get into the yoga practice.

I’ll be back with more blogs next week.  Unless more website  problems.

Peace,

Sinead

My Breakfast Yoga

This weeks breakfast yoga is all about warming up the body before leading into a strong flowing Vinyasa style practice.

Last week I let you know the main postures I use to warm up the body.  I tend to mix it up from time to time. Here is the first warm up sequence to get you going on your yoga mat.

I always sit and focus on my breath for a minimum of 5 minutes. Often I focus more on the exhale and a sense of my body weight dropping towards the floor with the out breath. However always keeping the the spine straight, with shoulders directly over the hips and the chin parallel to the floor.  This meditation practice helps to ground the body and clear the mind.

Move from this short meditation into a childs pose. Hush Yoga, Sinead in Childs Pose

When in Childs pose begin Ujjaya breathing.  Also begin to connect to the core centre, applying Uddiyana Bhanda and Mulabhanda (drawing the navel gently back to the spine while using the pelvic floor muscles).

Stretch the arms, lifting the whole arm off the floor so only the hand is resting on the floor.  Draw the head of the arm bone back and hug the arms towards each other to create strength and stability.

Move forward onto hands and knees. Place hands directly under shoulders and shoulder distance apart, knees under hips, hip width apart.  Begin Cat, dropping the head and tail bone down to toward the floor while lifting the middle spine up towards the ceiling like a cat.   Reverse into cow stretch lifting the head and tail bone up towards the ceiling while dropping the middle spine.  Maintain a strong connection to the core centre, trying not to let go of the belly, especially in Cow stretch. (sorry no photos)

Move back into child’s pose for 2-3 breaths.

Hush Yoga, Adho Mukha SvanasanaMove into downward dog, keeping knees bent at first, with heals lifting high up off the floor.

Then stretch into the full pose.  You can bend one knee while stretching the opposite heal towards the floor.  This helps to warm up and loosen the calf muscle and hamstring, ( great after a night in high heal shoes ladies 😉 ).  Then make sure you hold a still downward dog for a while, focusing on breath and Bhandas (core centre)


Hush Yoga, Uttihita Chaturanga Dandasana

Plank Pose, Hush Yoga From downward dog move into plank pose holding for a few breaths and then lower through chataranga to the floor.



Prepare for baby cobra pose.  Place hands Beside shoulders and lift chest off the floor, with out using in the hands to lift the chest up, so only the back is doing the work.

Hush Yoga, Baby Cobra

It is important to use your core muscles in cobra pose and also make sure the legs are strong by stretching the thigh bone back, spreading toes wide, turning thighs in slightly and moving tailbone forward without gripping the buttox.  Lower to body back to floor.Sinead, Hush Yoga

Move through baby cobra to full cobra however keep the elbows slightly bent, making sure the shoulder blades are moving in towards the spine and the shoulders are pulling down from the neck/ears at all times.

Move back to Childs pose for a few breaths.

Voila!  Ther’s  a simple yet very beneficial warm up.

Over the  next week I will break down the above postures in more detail.

Next weeks Breakfast Yoga will be a continuation from this warm up leading  through a flowing sequence towards sun salutations.

Enjoy your yoga practice.  Be kind to your body, take your time and warm up properly.

Peace,

Sinead.







My Yoga Breakfast.

The Benefits of Eating Hearty Porridge. Hush Yoga, My Yoga Breakfast.

Last week I gave you the the delicious recipe for one of my favourite  breakfasts.  Porridge a great reward after an early yoga/meditation practice.  Being a comfort  food it’s especially good at this time of year, warming the body up before facing the cold day ahead.

Below is a list of benefits of  porridge.  Come back next week for another yoga breakfast.

Peace,

Sinead

Benenfits of Porridge:

  • Soluble Fibre Reduces LDL Cholesterol (Bad Cholesterol) without lowering HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol).
  • Soluble Fiber balances sugar levels by slowing down the digestion of starch.
  • Slow releasing complex carbohydrates stabilize sugar levels hence sustaining energy
  • Phytcochemicals found in oats are cancer –fighting.
  • Reduces symptoms of IBS
  • Can reduce the risk of heart disease as the oats latch on to saturated fat drawing fats out of the body.
  • Contains vitamins and minerals such as Vitamin E, Selenium, copper, magnesium and zinc.

Enjoy your Breakfast Yoga.  Enjoy your Yoga Breakfast.  Move your Body & Free Your Mind.

The Dance Of Yoga

The Dance of Yoga

“We have become so dependent on the form of a yoga pose that we have forgotten how to feel a pose from within.  While it is necessary to learn correct alignment trying to “copy” an exact shape of a yoga pose is unrealistic.   After all we are all uniquely different in our bodies shape, height, weight, flexibility and strength.  For some a yoga practice has become all about getting to the next challenging pose or being able to achieve the physical form while feeling it from the inside is secondary and sometimes there is no connection made to the internal sense of the pose at all.

In our modern form of yoga we are loosing this point of the practice.   Being caught up with how the body should look, moving to advanced postures and what you think you should be doing on a yoga mat actually brings you further from your centre and closer to your inhibitions.

Let me put it to you like this.  When you look at a ballet dancer she is beautiful in her movement, her poise is perfection, the lines and shapes she creates are a pure form of art.   The dancer has been trained so well and with such determination to hold exact shapes, to move beyond any normal physical limitation and to constantly achieve perfection in balletic technique.

While this to the onlooker can look as such freedom in movement for the dancer it is emotionally restricting.   Most ballet dancers, whilst maintaining their elegance off stage, there is often a tightness or strictness in their manner.  Their presence is far from the free, beautiful Giselle they portray when performing.  The ballerina has been practicing her art for so long and with so much control her off-stage posture reflects this constraint, lacking ease and freedom in her personality.

In comparison, look at a contemporary dancer, salsa dancer or street dancer.  You instantly connect to the freedom and fun in their movement.  Their bodies are so much more relaxed and secure. Yet they too have learned technique and alignment.  They have moved beyond that form to find their own expression and that is the beauty in their body and the expression in their dance.   If you meet one of these free form dancers off their stage their personality often reflects the freedom they have found in their movement.  They tend to be very down to earth, open minded and very real.

Like the ballet dancer if you are constantly trying to reach perfection in any pose you immediately create inner limitations.   When we focus too much on alignment and getting a posture correct we are not in union with our true self because we are in our head.  When we are in our head we loose out on experiencing the fullness of a moment and the true depth, meaning and feeling of the pose.   You loose the connection to your heart and instead of being free of your ego you feed your ego.

It is important to learn alignment and shapes of a posture but there comes a time when it is time to move out of an idea of what a yoga practice “should” be like and instead move from within to find true expression.  There comes a time that it is important to connect to your inner self and feel what your body really needs for you, in that moment of time.

Learn how to move your body in a safe way but also learn how to play around with that.   Too much form will make you the ballet dancer of yoga.  Too much strictness in your practice will actually do the opposite to what yoga is supposed to do.   Yoga will bring you in union with who you are not with what you are “supposed” to be, but only if you practice it in harmony with your own needs.

When you move from within you are in your heart.  When you are in your heart you are fully present.  When you are fully present you are in Yoga.   Being able to pay attention to what’s going on inside and being able to express that through your body and through asana is Yoga.   This way of practicing yoga will have a much more profound effect on your entire being.   It will help you to release blockages and restraints.  Then you will find liberation in your body and mind.   Most importantly you will do this in your own truth, not in the truth of others.

Peace,

Sinead.

p.s. Would love to hear your comments.  What kind of yoga do you practice, the ballet of yoga or the contemporary dance form?  If so, how do you benefit or not, from this?

Autumn Yoga

“Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower.” ~Albert Camus

Autumn, my favourite time of year, is here again.  Well, I love spring too; probably because nature is so noticeably changing at these times.  We are blessed in our beautiful country with the variety of vibrant colours  in Autumn. The colour of the sky changes to a subtle glow while the leaves are intensely rich in beauty.  It’s really a striking time.

Autumn is a preparation, a fall towards winter.  With the force of mother nature letting go of all she has grown and nurtured throughout the year, we, too, can let go of all we don’t need at this time of year.   As animals gather in preparation for their winter sleep, we, too, begin to gather and naturally begin to draw energy inward in prepartion for our short, cold days and long dark nights.

With regard to your yoga practice, hip openers are great postures to benefit the process of letting go, and focusing on the exhale can deepen the effect.  You may remember my previous blog, “Open your hips, release your emotions” where I wrote in more length about the hip opening practice.

According to both Ayurvedic and Chineese medicine, Autumn is a time that the mind can be noticeably active with fresh inspiration.  It is, therefore, vital to clear any unnecessary emotion; to release any stored tension around the upper back and neck.  For this reason, adding upper back and shoulder releasing work to our practice is often necessary.  It will keep energy flowing from your body to mind, and vice verse.

This will help to open the pathway to allow your creativity to flow naturally.  It makes sense to me that Autumn is the time to allow new ideas to surface, with Winter being a time to ponder, allowing what has appeared to sit within, before the coming of Spring allows you to plant the seeds of creativity that have passed the test of hibernation.

However, because the mind can be so active at this time of year, it is time for the “A-type” personality, often characterized by a highly stressed or anxious state, to pay particular care.  To help counterbalance the dangerous effects of these feelings, it is important to do plenty of grounding yoga postures, such as forward bends and, once again, hip openers.  If you can manage a headstand safely, include it on days when you feel it is possible.  This will bring your mind as close to the earth as it can possibly be!

Sitting in mediation for at least 20 minutes a day is highly recommended, but any length of time is better than none!  Sit and observe the natural flow of breath.  Don’t make demands from the mind. Let it think, let it do what it needs to do.  On noticing your mind has wondered to your thoughts, simply observe.  Then gently bring your mind back to your breath, without any judgment.  Be aware of the breath, and focus fully on how it enters and exits the body.

My last advice for the moment is for all us “urban dwellers” to get out of the city from time to time.  Walk in nature, being mindful of the stunning change of season.  Allow the vibrant colours to be absorbed by your body and mind.  Feel the fresh, country air, and try to be fully present in this glory.  Then nature will support you in return, as you will have supported her by simply noticing her beauty.

Om Peace, Peace, Peace.

Sinead